Preventative Dentistry

Preventative Dentistry

Dental Examination, the check-up

This examination includes:

  • This examination includes:
    An examination of your teeth and soft tissues.
  • All necessary X-rays and intra-oral photos.

 

The dentist will check your teeth for cavities and your gums for any sign of gum-disease.

Plaque is a film of bacteria that sticks onto your teeth. When the plaque builds up, it will harden and form calculus. Calculus cannot be removed with just tooth brushing and requires special instruments to remove it.

This is what can give rise to decay in your teeth and gum disease if it is not removed. Your dentist will assess your entire mouth, including your jaw, tongue, throat, face and neck for infection, disease or cancer.

Your dentist will discuss their findings with you and form a custom-made treatment plan that is suitable to your needs.

Scale & Clean

We have a dedicated hygienist that performs most of our dental cleans.

Brushing and flossing help clean the plaque and food debris from your teeth.

Over time, plaque becomes calcified from the calcium and phosphate in your saliva, and when this happens your regular toothbrush is not powerful enough to remove it.

When the hygienist cleans your teeth, they will use special dental instruments to remove:

  • Plaque
  • Food debris
  • Bacteria
  • Calculus

This will be removed by scaling, polishing and flossing your teeth.

Dental Xrays

Dental Xrays (radiographs) are very important in diagnosing and preventing oral disease that is not visible to the naked eye.

Your dentist can assess the radiograph and find any hidden infection or abnormalities and give you a complete account of your teeth and mouth.

Without the radiographs, many potential diseases will not be detected.

Dental radiographs can assess for any infection or decay between the teeth, bone loss, problems at the root, the position of the root and teeth, abscess, cancer or non-cancerous tumours.

Decay can present itself between your teeth that cannot be detected with the naked- eye. By catching it early, before it spreads, you are much better able to save your tooth, discomfort, time and money.

Orthopantomogram (OPG)

An OPG is a full X-ray image of the mouth, which shows the jaw, teeth, roots, wisdom teeth and surrounding structures.

This will help to diagnose and assess:

  • An overall screen of your teeth
  • Wisdom teeth
  • Dental pain
  • Implants
  • Orthodontic treatment
  • Cancerous or non-cancerous tumours

Your dentist will discuss with you whether an OPG is required for your mouth, depending on your dental needs.

Pit & Fissure Sealants

The pit fissure sealants help protect the deep grooves of your molar teeth from bacteria and plaque.  When the grooves are very deep or stained, your dentist may recommend sealants. This is a safe way of protecting the grooves of your teeth and minimise the depth of the groove, so that plaque and bacteria do not get stuck into the tiny depths of the groove and cause decay.

Which Teeth should be sealed?

Teeth which have deep grooves are often difficult, or at times impossible to keep clean solely through routine brushing. Often these deep grooves harbour bacteria which decay the tooth. Sealants are used to prevent these grooves from bacterial destruction. Sealants are only applied to the back teeth – the molars and premolars. These are the teeth that have ‘pits’ (small hollows) and ‘fissures’ (grooves) on their biting surfaces. Your dental team will tell you which teeth should be sealed after they have examined them and checked whether the fissures are deep enough for sealing to help. Some teeth naturally have deep grooves which will need to be sealed; others have shallow ones which will not need sealing.

What is involved?

The process is usually quick and straightforward, taking only a few minutes for each tooth. The tooth is thoroughly cleaned, prepared with a special solution, and dried. The liquid sealant is then applied and allowed to set hard – usually by shining a bright light onto it.

How do pit and fissure sealant work?

The sealant forms a smooth, protective barrier by covering all the little grooves and dips in the surface of the tooth. Dental decay easily starts in these grooves if they are not sealed. When should this be done?

Sealants are often applied as soon as the first permanent teeth start to come through. This is usually between 6 and 7 years of age. The rest are usually sealed as soon as they appear which can be any time between 11 and 14 years of age. Do you still need to clean your teeth?

It is still very important to clean your teeth. The smooth, sealed surface is now much easier to keep clean and healthy with normal brushing. Using a fluoride toothpaste, last thing at night and at least one other time during the day, will help to protect your teeth. Pit and fissure sealing can reduce tooth decay and the number of fillings you might need.

If you would like to know more about the treatment, ask your dentist. They will tell you if fissure sealing will help your teeth, and if it is the right time to do it.

Fluoride Treatments

Fluoride is the most effective agent available to help prevent tooth decay.

It is a mineral that is naturally present in varying amounts in almost all foods and water supplies.

The benefits of fluoride have been well known for over 50 years and are supported by many health and professional organizations.

Although most people receive fluoride from food and water, sometimes it is not enough to help prevent decay.

Your dentist or dental hygienist may recommend the use of home and/or professional fluoride treatments for the following reasons:

  • to reduce the chance of new areas of decay in the future, 
  • arrest any decay that may be present. 

 

This is usually performed after your regular scale & clean.

]Doctor giving dental treatment to man at clinic

Dental Examination,
the check-up

This examination includes:

  • This examination includes:
    An examination of your teeth and soft tissues.
  • All necessary X-rays and intra-oral photos.

 

The dentist will check your teeth for cavities and your gums for any sign of gum-disease.

Plaque is a film of bacteria that sticks onto your teeth. When the plaque builds up, it will harden and form calculus. Calculus cannot be removed with just tooth brushing and requires special instruments to remove it.

This is what can give rise to decay in your teeth and gum disease if it is not removed. Your dentist will assess your entire mouth, including your jaw, tongue, throat, face and neck for infection, disease or cancer.

Your dentist will discuss their findings with you and form a custom-made treatment plan that is suitable to your needs.

Series of dentist showing correct method of brushing teeth

Scale & Clean

We have a dedicated hygienist that performs most of our dental cleans.

Brushing and flossing help clean the plaque and food debris from your teeth.

Over time, plaque becomes calcified from the calcium and phosphate in your saliva, and when this happens your regular toothbrush is not powerful enough to remove it.

When the hygienist cleans your teeth, they will use special dental instruments to remove:

  • Plaque
  • Food debris
  • Bacteria
  • Calculus

This will be removed by scaling, polishing and flossing your teeth.

Dental X-ray

Xrays

Dental Xrays (radiographs) are very important in diagnosing and preventing oral disease that is not visible to the naked eye.

Your dentist can assess the radiograph and find any hidden infection or abnormalities and give you a complete account of your teeth and mouth.

Without the radiographs, many potential diseases will not be detected.

Dental radiographs can assess for any infection or decay between the teeth, bone loss, problems at the root, the position of the root and teeth, abscess, cancer or non-cancerous tumours.

Decay can present itself between your teeth that cannot be detected with the naked- eye. By catching it early, before it spreads, you are much better able to save your tooth, discomfort, time and money.

Orthopantomogram (OPG)

An OPG is a full X-ray image of the mouth, which shows the jaw, teeth, roots, wisdom teeth and surrounding structures.

This will help to diagnose and assess:

  • An overall screen of your teeth
  • Wisdom teeth
  • Dental pain
  • Implants
  • Orthodontic treatment
  • Cancerous or non-cancerous tumours

Your dentist will discuss with you whether an OPG is required for your mouth, depending on your dental needs.

Pit & Fissure Sealants

The pit fissure sealants help protect the deep grooves of your molar teeth from bacteria and plaque.  When the grooves are very deep or stained, your dentist may recommend sealants. This is a safe way of protecting the grooves of your teeth and minimise the depth of the groove, so that plaque and bacteria do not get stuck into the tiny depths of the groove and cause decay.

Which Teeth should be sealed?

Teeth which have deep grooves are often difficult, or at times impossible to keep clean solely through routine brushing. Often these deep grooves harbour bacteria which decay the tooth. Sealants are used to prevent these grooves from bacterial destruction. Sealants are only applied to the back teeth – the molars and premolars. These are the teeth that have ‘pits’ (small hollows) and ‘fissures’ (grooves) on their biting surfaces. Your dental team will tell you which teeth should be sealed after they have examined them and checked whether the fissures are deep enough for sealing to help. Some teeth naturally have deep grooves which will need to be sealed; others have shallow ones which will not need sealing.

What is involved?

The process is usually quick and straightforward, taking only a few minutes for each tooth. The tooth is thoroughly cleaned, prepared with a special solution, and dried. The liquid sealant is then applied and allowed to set hard – usually by shining a bright light onto it.

How do pit and fissure sealant work?

The sealant forms a smooth, protective barrier by covering all the little grooves and dips in the surface of the tooth. Dental decay easily starts in these grooves if they are not sealed. When should this be done?

Sealants are often applied as soon as the first permanent teeth start to come through. This is usually between 6 and 7 years of age. The rest are usually sealed as soon as they appear which can be any time between 11 and 14 years of age. Do you still need to clean your teeth?

It is still very important to clean your teeth. The smooth, sealed surface is now much easier to keep clean and healthy with normal brushing. Using a fluoride toothpaste, last thing at night and at least one other time during the day, will help to protect your teeth. Pit and fissure sealing can reduce tooth decay and the number of fillings you might need.

If you would like to know more about the treatment, ask your dentist. They will tell you if fissure sealing will help your teeth, and if it is the right time to do it.

Fluoride Treatments

Fluoride is the most effective agent available to help prevent tooth decay. It is a mineral that is naturally present in varying amounts in almost all foods and water supplies. The benefits of fluoride have been well known for over 50 years and are supported by many health and professional organizations. Although most people receive fluoride from food and water, sometimes it is not enough to help prevent decay. Your dentist or dental hygienist may recommend the use of home and/or professional fluoride treatments for the following reasons:
  • to reduce the chance of new areas of decay in the future,
  • arrest any decay that may be present.
This is usually performed after your regular scale & clean.

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